Hmong Home and GardenPostPollination among squash
Hmong Home and GardenPostPollination among squash

Pollination among squash

Cross-pollination among squash is a fascinating process that occurs when pollen from one squash flower fertilizes another squash flower. This can result in the creation of hybrid squash varieties with characteristics from both parent plants. Squash plants are members of the Cucurbita family and produce both male and female flowers, typically pollinated by insects like bees. To avoid unintentional cross-pollination, gardeners can plant different squash groups far apart, as some types only cross with others within their group. For example, C. pepo varieties will only cross with other C. pepo types, so they can be planted near C. moschata or C. maxima without concern. However, if different varieties within the same group are planted too close together, gardeners may need to take extra steps to prevent cross-pollination, such as hand-pollinating flowers and then sealing them to exclude insects. It’s important to note that cross-pollination affects only the seeds, not the fruit produced in the current year, so the squash harvested will remain true to the parent plant. However, if seeds from this fruit are saved and planted the following year, the resulting plants may bear squash that shows traits from both parent varieties.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *